Soul Food Studio

How to make Mattisse inspired wall art

CraftsAmanda Russell

Create a bold Matisse inspired fabric wall art. Use simple motifs to make an impactful piece of wall art.

You Will Need

  • Canvas, £8, Hobbycraft
  • Tracing paper
  • Bondaweb £3.90 Akaban
  • Fabric scraps
  • Stapler
  • Pencil, paper and tracing paper
  • Command Strips from £2.70 B&Q

Step-by-step

  1. Place the canvas on a large piece of paper and draw around the edge of the canvas, add 10cm to each side.
  2. Draw your design on the paper and mark each colour. Using the tracing paper trace the shape for each colour.
  3. Iron paper backed Bondaweb to the reverse of fabric scraps. Cut out the shapes, then remove backing paper and iron to bond in position. Use a sewing machine to sew around the edge of the fabric shapes.
  4. Place the fabric image on the canvas and stretch the fabric over the edge, use the stapler to secure the fabric at the back.
  5. Hang on the wall using Command Strips

Tips

  • When stapling the fabric on start from the middle and work towards the outer edge so there are no creases in the fabric

Book Review: House of Cards By Sarah Hamilton

Amanda Russell
Have you ever wanted to find out about the ins and outs of selling your own handmade cards? We are a nation of card givers, greetings cards punctuate and chronicle our lives, House of Cards by artist Sarah Hamilton is a book that celebrates the greeting card industry as well as showing you how to become part of it using your own designs. It is an attractive book full of fresh bright visuals and shows you how to make money from your art. Full of sassy know how, packed with expert tips and advice from practising artists, it's a designers must have manual. A practical as well as informative book it helps short circuit some of the hard work of starting out selling your own cards.

Have you ever wanted to find out about the ins and outs of selling your own handmade cards? We are a nation of card givers, greetings cards punctuate and chronicle our lives, House of Cards by artist Sarah Hamilton is a book that celebrates the greeting card industry as well as showing you how to become part of it using your own designs.

It is an attractive book full of fresh bright visuals and shows you how to make money from your art. Full of sassy know how, packed with expert tips and advice from practising artists, it's a designers must have manual. A practical as well as informative book it helps short circuit some of the hard work of starting out selling your own cards.

Card by Sarah Hamilton image by James Bolston The book is divided into two sections, the first contains an informative account of the history of greetings card giving, along with all the nitty gritty and practical detail to help get you started with card creation and sales. There is also an invaluable chapter by artist agent Jehane Boden Spiers giving inside advice on liscencing art work as well as insight into the deals available to designers to increase their portfolio of earning potential as well as providing a nest egg.

Card by Sarah Hamilton image by James Bolston

The book is divided into two sections, the first contains an informative account of the history of greetings card giving, along with all the nitty gritty and practical detail to help get you started with card creation and sales. There is also an invaluable chapter by artist agent Jehane Boden Spiers giving inside advice on liscencing art work as well as insight into the deals available to designers to increase their portfolio of earning potential as well as providing a nest egg.

Artwork by Lynn Guinta mage by Kevin Cozad To get you started on your own creative journey the second section has 10 exciting practical easy to follow step by step projects introducing many techniques such as lino, screen printing and decoupage. Show casing ten artists it gives us the unique opportunity of having a private glimpse into the artist working studio. The book is generous and each case study starts with a short piece about the artist as well as hints on tools and techniques and inspiration to help you create your own personal artwork.

Artwork by Lynn Guinta mage by Kevin Cozad

To get you started on your own creative journey the second section has 10 exciting practical easy to follow step by step projects introducing many techniques such as lino, screen printing and decoupage. Show casing ten artists it gives us the unique opportunity of having a private glimpse into the artist working studio. The book is generous and each case study starts with a short piece about the artist as well as hints on tools and techniques and inspiration to help you create your own personal artwork.

Card by Lynn Guinta image by Kevin Cozad The book supports the inspiring Just a Card campaign. The premise is that card sales are an important part of independent artists and shops income generation and if we all buy cards when we visit them we help keep them going. An attractive book full of energy and packed with invaluable advice, it's an indispensible bookshelf addition for anyone in the visual design industry wanting generate an income in the world of greeting cards. 

Card by Lynn Guinta image by Kevin Cozad

The book supports the inspiring Just a Card campaign. The premise is that card sales are an important part of independent artists and shops income generation and if we all buy cards when we visit them we help keep them going.

An attractive book full of energy and packed with invaluable advice, it's an indispensible bookshelf addition for anyone in the visual design industry wanting generate an income in the world of greeting cards. 

Cards by Gabriela Szulman image by Kristy Noble House of Cards by Sarah Hamilton is published by Pavilion. Find them on Instagram at -  @pavilionbooks @hoc.cardbook @justacard @sarahhamiltonprints @jehanebodenspiers_

Cards by Gabriela Szulman image by Kristy Noble

House of Cards by Sarah Hamilton is published by Pavilion.

Find them on Instagram at - 

@pavilionbooks @hoc.cardbook @justacard @sarahhamiltonprints @jehanebodenspiers_

How to Style Your Interior With Plants

Amanda Russell
1 Mark Diacono from Lia Leendertz My Tiny Inddor Garden .jpg

We all want our home to look wonderful and project our personality without making any costly mistakes. As an interior stylist working on magazines and in interior design, I believe everyone has their own unique style, but pin pointing it can be a tricky one with so many visual influences and different avenues to tempt you. Just now plants are having a moment, we all love a bit of greenery in our home. Firm up your style identity with a few simple styling tricks to set you on the right track when you are working with plants. 

IMG_2005.jpg

House plants are slow growing and are in danger of making a room appear static and repetitious. Ring the changes, breath new life into a space by using plants as props and showing off your chosen hero object at its best. The styling hero can be anything that takes your fancy, I dip into my shop where I stock vintage ceramics, vases, vessels and figures.

Get Yourself an Asymetric Coffee Table

CraftsAmanda Russell

Have yourself an enviable conversation piece coffee table by transforming a very ordinary coffee table with a new asymmetrical top and a lick of paint.

You Will Need

  • Lisabo Tabe Ikea
  • 20mm MDF 
  • Black and Decker electric jig saw and drill
  • Paint 
  • Varnish
  • Wood filler 
  • Screws
  1. Using the jig saw cut the table top over hang off the table. Draw the shape of the new table top on the MDF. Cut out with the jigsaw. Sand the edges of the table and MDF.
  2. Paint the MDF table top blush and the legs graphite.
  3. Place the MDF table top on the table, drill through the new top into the old top then screw down.
  4. Fill screw holes with two part filler when dry sand and retouch paint.
  5. When dry paint the whole table with quick dry

Tip

  • This table gives lots of space for styling a table scape, I love the zingy saffron I chose. For a new look, change your styling accessories with the season.

Stamp your own floral lampshade

CraftsAmanda Russell

I love simple bold classic 60s florals and designed a print in a bright vibrant green for a large lampshade. This is a very simple way to create your own bespoke piece of designer homeware.

You will already have many of the things you need for this low-tech hand printing project and there are only a couple of specialize products you will need.

You will need:

  • Plain drum lampshade 
  • Dylon fabric paints in Green and Yellow from
  • Acrylic block
  • Tracing paper
  • Pencil
  • Rubber
  • Masking tape
  • Glue stick
  • Hobby foam sheet
  • Car wash sponge
  • Scissors
  • OHP pen (overhead projector pen)
  • Masking tape

Step by Step

  1. Measure the lampshade and draw a design to fit, then trace onto tracing paper. Use a permanent OHP pen to mark the center back of the acrylic block. Place the design under the acrylic block and trace onto the reverse side of the block with the OHP pen.
  2. To transfer the image onto the foam sheet, place the tracing paper design face down on foam, and then scribble over the back with a soft pencil.
  3. Cut out your design from the foam sheet using scissors and a craft knife. Stick the cut out pieces in position on the acrylic block using a glue stick.
  4. Place a line of masking tape around the top and bottom edges of the lampshade.
  5. Mix up your fabric-printing colour, I made a lime green by mixing the yellow with the green about half a pot for this design. For the fabric paint applicator cut a piece 3cm cubed from the car wash sponge. Dab one side of the foam in the fabric paint until it is evenly coated. Then dab the fabric paint onto the design block and print on paper to check colour.
  6. Start printing onto the lampshade, beginning at the seam, reloading the block with paint after each impression.

Tip

  • Transparent acrylic blocks take the headache out of positioning the block especially when printing repeat designs.

Bang on Trend Super Easy Picture Shelf

CraftsAmanda Russell

Have you ever marvelled at curated collections of pictures and wondered how you can move them about without damaging your walls? This great little picture shelf is the answer, use it to display your own curated collection of pictures, it’s easy to move them around again and again whenever you want to change the look.

You Will Need

  • Wood strip and beading
  • Brass picture hooks
  • White matt emulsion paint
  • Electric Drill Black and Decker
  • Rawl plugless screws
  • Panel pins
  1. Measure the wood strip and beading and use a saw to cut both pieces of wood to the same length.
  2. Place the beading strip in the centre of the wood strip.
  3. Hammer in position using panel pins.
  4. Paint with white emulsion.
  5. Screw the brass picture hooks on the back edge.
  6. Mark and drill holes for screws on the wall, then screw the shelf in place.

Tip

  • Paint the shelf with the same colour as the walls so it blends into the room

Upmarket Luxurious Upholstered Footstool

Amanda Russell

Yawn, yawn, a coffee table's a coffee table's a coffee table. I wanted something a little different and an upmarket luxury upholstered stool fitted the bill perfectly. It just took an Ikea coffee table and lots of imagination to make it into a fab statement footstool. 

You will need:

  • Nornas coffee table, Ikea
  • Fabric
  • Cot mattress
  • Wadding
  • Saw
  • Tape measure
  • Staple gun
  1. Before assembling your table, measure halfway down each of the legs and saw them in half.
  2. Paint the legs and the underside of the coffee table with black paint. Once the paint is dry follow the instructions to put the table together.
  3. Cut your mattress to fit the top of your coffee table. Piece the off cuts together to make a shape that fits the table top.
  4. Place the trimmed mattress and off cuts on top of the table and cover with wadding. Staple the wadding to the underside of the table to hold everything together.
  5. Lay the printed fabric on top of the wadding and staple underneath. For neat corners fold and sew the fabric in place.

Book Review - Urban Pioneer: Interiors Inspired by Industrial Design by Sara Emslie

Book ReviewsAmanda Russell
Architecture Design by Manifold Architecture studio, Brooklyn, NY

Architecture Design by Manifold Architecture studio, Brooklyn, NY

How can I resist the new book by interior stylist that just arrived on my desk, Urban Pioneer: Interiors Inspired by Industrial Design. The pioneers, mostly designers and artisans have colonised and renovated exindustrial and non residential buildings where they combine work with living, to create a new urban lifestyle. They have thrown out the rules of traditional interiors and the newly emerged style reflects the remnants of the industrial past, generous windows letting in lots of light, metal finishes, exposed pipes and brick work. 

The canalside home and gallery of creative director, art dealer and location owner Mark Chalmers in Amsterdam www.thegarageamsterdam.com 

The canalside home and gallery of creative director, art dealer and location owner Mark Chalmers in Amsterdam www.thegarageamsterdam.com 

The urban pioneer is a style that's in demand, we are all familiar with the open plan look of these large industrial spaces, flexible, less permanent and more mobile. The pioneers have licence to break the mould, be bold and take the opportunity to experiment, take risks while rethinking scale. The book examines twelve case histories, all individual, illustrating a variety of ways to design post industrial interiors.

The London home of Peter Wim

The London home of Peter Wim

While all the spaces have a strong sense of reflecting the anatomy of the building, pioneers adapt their space to their individual needs. And don't think it's all about the utillitarian, as this ultimately depends on where the pioneer chooses to draw the line. Some like to allow for domestic softening and flights of fancy. Amsterdam interior by designer James van der Velden has a spectacular lush wall painted in the manner of a classical artist.

 Designer James van der Velden of Bricks Studio

 Designer James van der Velden of Bricks Studio

While the kitchen of graphic designer Anouk Pruim, is pared back, no frills, basic chic, reflected in salvedged utility used for furnishing the space. In the New York home of Houssein Jarouche my favourite, a vintage modern interior, has ecclectic kitchen cupboards that are boldly collaged with colourful graphic tape.

Designer James van der Velden of Bricks Studio, Amsterdam

Designer James van der Velden of Bricks Studio, Amsterdam

If you want to get that Urban Pioneer look, this book, packed with visual pointers will help you put together your own take on interiors inspired by industrial design.